Interesting Facts About 50 US State Animals

Last updated on October 13th, 2021

Interesting Facts about 50 US State Animals

1. Alabama — Black Bear

Black bears can spend as long as 6 months in hibernation to cope with cold weather and food shortage.

This Black Bear was gorging herself on berries fattening herself up for her winter slumber.
This Black Bear was gorging herself on berries fattening herself up for her winter slumber. Image credit – shutterstock/Brad Doerksen

2. Alaska — Moose

Baby moose weigh around 28 lbs at birth but they grow rapidly in the first 5 months to achieve 10 times their initial size.

Male Moose Against Backdrop of Mountains
Male Moose Against Backdrop of Mountains. Image via – shutterstock/Darryl Brooks

3. Arizona — Ringtail

Ringtail cats can rotate their hind feet up to 180 degrees, providing them excellent grip when descending trees, walls, cacti, and rocky cliffs.

ringtail cat looks toward the camera on granite
Ringtail cat looks toward the camera on granite. Image via shutterstock/Carlos R Cedillo

4. Arkansas — White-tailed Deer

Adult white-tails change the color of their coat from bright reddish brown during summers to dull grayish-brown during winters to help them blend in with their environments.

White tailed Deer fawn leaping in field
White tailed Deer fawn leaping in field. Interesting facts about 50 US State animals. Image via shutterstock/Pictureguy

5. California — Grizzly Bear

Grizzly bears can gain over 3 lbs a day during autumn by eating whitebark pine nuts all day to prepare for hibernation.

A grizzly bear hunting salmon at Brooks falls, Katmai National Park, Alaska. Image via shutterstock/Michal_K

6. Colorado — Rocky Mt. Bighorn Sheep

Male bighorn sheep ram each other for female mating rights with the clash of horns audible from a mile away.

Sheep posing for the camera.
Sheep posing for the camera. Interesting facts about 50 US State animals. Image via – shutterstock/AL PARKER PHOTOGRAPHY

7. Connecticut — Sperm Whale

Sperm whales got their name from spermaceti, the oil sac in their heads that help them focus sound. This waxy substance used to be a popular material for candles, lubricants, and oil lamps. Sperm whales are known for their large heads that account for one-third of their body length

sperm whale, physeter macrocephalus, Indian Ocean
Sperm whale, physeter macrocephalus, Indian Ocean. Image via shutterstock/Martin Prochazkacz

8. Delaware — Gray Fox

Gray foxes are among the few species in the canid family that can climb trees to forage or escape predators thanks to their semi-retractable claws and rotating wrists.

a grey fox in search of food
A grey fox in search of food. Interesting facts about 50 US State animals. Image via shutterstock/Nice Capture

9. Florida — Manatee

Manatees weigh between 440 and 1,300 lbs. They are voracious eaters that can consume a tenth of their weight in 24 hours, often in the form of algae, weeds, and water grasses.

Manatee and diver. This manatee couldn't care less about the diving photographer behind him. In fact, it looks like the diver forgot about his camera as he got close to the manatee.
Manatee and diver. This manatee couldn’t care less about the diving photographer behind him. In fact, it looks like the diver forgot about his camera as he got close to the manatee. Image via shutterstock/Jeff Stamer

10. Georgia — Right Whale

Right whales were hunted almost to extinction due to their precious oil and baleen but their population has grown again thanks to international protection. According to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration, the right whale got its name because it was the right whale to hunt—it moved slowly and would float after being killed.

Southern right whale and her calf, Nuevo Gulf, Valdes Peninsula, Argentina.
Southern right whale and her calf, Nuevo Gulf, Valdes Peninsula, Argentina. Image via shutterstock/wildestanimal

11. Hawaii Mammal — Hawaii Monk Seal

Instead of shedding skin and fur throughout the year, the Hawaii monk seal does this within a two-week period known as an annual “catastrophic molt”.

Hawaiian Monk Seal.
Hawaiian Monk Seal. Image via shutterstock/Tory Kallman

12. Idaho — Appaloosa

In the 1600s, the horses of Spanish explorers reached Native Americans who bred them to become the colorful and gentle Appaloosa. The name comes from the Palouse River where they were located.

Appaloosa Horse, Adult Galloping through Meadow
Appaloosa Horse, Adult Galloping through Meadow. Image via shutterstock/slowmotiongli

13. Illinois — White-tailed Deer

The males are easy to spot during summer and autumn because they grow a set of antlers. However, these fall off in the winter.

White tailed buck deer making a scrape on a gravel trail
White tailed buck deer making a scrape on a gravel trail. Interesting facts about 50 US State animals. Image via shutterstock/Tom Reichner

14. Indiana — Northern Cardinal

Norther Cardinals are birds with large beaks. They sometimes use to attack their own reflection while passionately defending their territory during breeding season.

Northern Cardinal Mates Facing Each Other
Northern Cardinal Mates Facing Each Other. Image via shutterstock/Bonnie Taylor Barry

15. Iowa — Eastern Goldfinch

The Eastern Goldfinch, also known as American Goldfinch, lays pale blue-white eggs that are incubated for two weeks before hatching.

American Goldfinch
American Goldfinch male in Eastern Redbud tree. Marion, Illinois, USA. Image via shutterstock/Danita Delimont

16. Kansas — American Buffalo

The male American Buffalo often weigh more than a ton yet displays impressive speed and agility with top speeds reaching 30 miles per hour.

Large male of bison in the forest
Large male of bison in the forest. image via shutterstock/Volodymyr Burdiak

17. Kentucky — Gray Squirrel

Eastern gray squirrels are vital in seed dispersal since they prepare for the winter by burying food in different locations. The excess seeds eventually grow in the spring.

Close up of a grey squirrel yawning.
Close up of a grey squirrel yawning. Interesting facts about 50 US State animals. Image via shutterstock/Giedriius

18. Louisiana — Black Bear

Adult black bears are mostly solitary except for the mating season in the summer. Their tiny and hairless cubs are born during winter.

19. Maine — Moose

Moose tend to give birth to a single calf but twins are possible with abundant food. These herbivores love to eat the leaves, twigs, grass, and pond weeds.

20. Maryland — Thoroughbred Horse

According to a genetic study, 95% of all existing thoroughbred racehorses are descendants of only 28 ancestors from 18th century UK.

English Thoroughbred Horse, Mare with Foal Galloping through Meadow.
English Thoroughbred Horse, Mare with Foal Galloping through Meadow. Image via shutterstock/slowmotiongli

21. Massachusetts — Boston Terrier

The Boston Terrier is often called “The American Gentleman” because of its impeccable manners, friendly demeanor, and stylish tuxedo coat.

Boston Terrier
Boston Terrier on the green background. Interesting facts about 50 US State animals. Image via shutterstock/Lenka_N

22. Michigan — White-tailed Deer

The females can give birth to as many as three babies at a time after carrying them in the womb for seven months.

White tailed deer
White tailed deer. All 50 state animals. Image via shutterstock/Paolo-manzi

23. Minnesota — Common Loon

Loons are monogamous birds with pairs breeding together and defending their territory for about 5-10 years.

Baby Common Loon
Baby Common Loon riding on its parent’s back as the other parent Brings it a fish. Image via shutterstock/Brian Lasenby

24. Mississippi — White-tailed Deer

These herbivores feed on leaves, grass, twigs, nuts, fruits, corn, alfalfa, and fungi. They usually go out to graze at dawn and dusk.

Group of white-tailed deer crossing a road.
Group of white-tailed deer crossing a road. Interesting facts about 50 US State animals. Image via shutterstock/Amy Lutz

25. Missouri — Missouri Mule

During World War I, the British Army bought 350,000 Missouri mules and horses to move supplies. The mules also served in World War II for the US Army.

Brown and White Mule
Brown and White Mule in Stable at Missouri State Fair.m Image via shutterstock/Jon Kraft

26. Montana — Grizzly Bear

Grizzly bears are double the size of black bears but they are agile enough to climb trees, run hills, and swim.

Grizzly Bear, Montana.
Grizzly Bear walks across the road in Glacier National Park, in the Rocky Mountains of Montana. Image via shutterstock/Tom Reichner

27. Nebraska — White-tailed Deer

White-tails can sprint up to 30 miles per hour, jump up to 30 feet, and leap up to 10 feet when trying to evade predators.

White tail deer playing in the Platte River, Nebraska
White tail deer playing in the Platte River, Nebraska. Image via shutterstock/William T Smith

28. Nevada — Desert Bighorn Sheep

In the wet season, the desert bighorn sheep can get enough water from the grass they eat. In the dry season, they may have to feed on cacti or trek to springs every third day to survive.

bighorn sheep
Flaming Gorge desert bighorn sheep on red rocks. All 50 state animals. Image via shutterstock/Jen DeVos

29. New Hampshire — White-tailed Deer

White-tailed deer inhabit fields and meadows when it’s hot. They take shelter in the forests when it’s cold.

White-tailed Deer . facts about 50 state animals of the United States
White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) bucks fighting. Image via shutterstock/Danita Delimont

30. New Jersey — Horse

Wild horses travel in groups with one mature male, a few females, and young foals. By the age of two, the young males are driven away and eventually lead their own packs.

Horses run gallop in flower meadow
Horses run gallop in flower meadow. All 50 state animals. Image via shutterstock/Kwadrat

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